Paris (UK: /ˈpærɪs/ parr-iss; US: /ˈpɛərɪs/ pair-iss; French: [paʁi]) is the capital of France. The City of Paris has an area of 105 square kilometres (41 square miles for those not familiar with the by now widely spread metric system) and has a population of 2M people within its city limits. The Paris Region covers 12K square kilometres (4.5K square miles), and has a population over 12 million people. Roughly the same size as Belgium (that other city just north of Paris) or a good two million more as the total headcount of Sweden (the larger Stockholm Region by comparison is half the size of Paris, and has a sixth of the population, a good two million including yours truly). 

Paris was founded in the 3rd century BC by a Celtic people called the Parisii, who gave the city its name (and not after Paris Hilton as some may believe). By the 12th century, Paris was the largest city in the western world, a prosperous trading centre, and the home of the University of Paris, one of the first in Europe. In the 18th century, it was the centre stage for the French Revolution, and became an important centre of finance, commerce, fashion, science, and the arts, a position it still retains today.

Paris is the home of the most visited art museum in the world, the Louvre, as well as some other big names like the Musée d’Orsay and the Musée National d’Art Moderne. The most notable architectural landmarks of Paris include Notre Dame Cathedral (12th century); the Sainte-Chapelle (13th century); the Eiffel Tower (1889); and the Basilica of Sacré-Cœur on Montmartre (1914) to name just a few.

Paris is not only the city of light and a romantic destination for many tourists around the globe, it is also the place where I first met my soulmate some good twenty years ago. A city full of memories of old and new friends alike.

So, when I woke up on Saturday and got greeted with a FB safety check that some of my friends in Paris checked in safely, it became instantly clear that disaster had struck in the centre of a city that is dear to me. Not a natural disaster inflicted by the whimsical moods of Mother Nature, but one inflicted by mankind.

A terror attack just one day after the terrible bombing  in Beirut.

Sad, meaningless, just a total waste of energy.

Is humanity in the twenty first century not grown beyond those barbaric acts our human history is known for ? Did we not grew up and learned from the past ?

The Celts, the Aztecs, The Dark Ages, Nazi Germany, Stalin, … they all had their dark spot to say the least, but humanity ploughed forward, and one could only have dreamed we were seriously moving to a flat world,  a world where humanity works together to solve the challenges of the 21st century and generations to come.

A world where we have to take global decisions together on our climate in just a few weeks, in that same city of light. Agree on how we can save our planet before we do unrecoverable damage that puts an end to humanity, full stop. Not just the left or the right, the north or the south, the east or the west. The full planet, all of us. Game over for species Homo Sapiens.

But it is not just us who can harm our little habitat here (although we do have a very good track record of being destructive), there is a long list out there of what can and will go wrong in the future and we have enough challenges to conquer and give our species a change of survival (if you wonder why Zurple and Quignee are keeping a close eye on Elon Musk and his Space X program, check out this awesomely inspiring blog).

Enough challenges ahead of us from a simple accidental asteroid to artificial super intelligence. We should not be shooting and blowing up people on a Friday evening (on no evening for that matter).

I am sad, and angry, and feel kind of helpless. Helpless we are not moving as humanity in the right direction of the bigger picture (which goes way beyond us as a species) and are still stuck in meaningless terror and violence.

Sad. Angry. Resolved.


I am sad, but at the same time resolved.

I cannot build a rocket to Mars or code a conscience into A.I. but I can speak up for our species in my work, in my photography.

Make sure I share the message of hope and inspiration.
Of building an intergalactic species that is known for its science and arts, just like the city of light. A species that believes in toys and imagination, in creativity and equality.

I hope my great grand children will look back and still find some inspiration in our generation.

I for sure will leave them my photography and hope it will inspire their children to look back at the past and smile on these whimsical great grandparents that took their toys to places to inspire creativity.

Paris, Beirut, Planet Earth, I Luv Ye.



Seattle (/siˈætəl/ see-at-əl) is a coastal seaport city on the wbest coast of the U.S. in the state of Washington. With an estimated 652,405 residents as of 2013, downtown Seattle is the largest city in the Pacific Northwest region of North America and the fastest-growing major city in the United States (did we mention the Seattle metropolitan area has approximate 3.6 million inhabitants including some of the world most famous geeks and AFOLs alike).

The city is situated on a narrow isthmus between Puget Sound and Lake Washington, about 160 kilometres (100 miles) south of the Canada–United States border. A major gateway for trade with Asia, Seattle is the 8th largest port in the United States and 9th largest in North America in terms of container handling and the very first city to hold the very first fine art LEGO photography exhibition in the Bryan Ohno Gallery.

A city with a Space Needle, a Ferris Wheel and new Friends.

A month has gone by since we were in Seattle for the grand opening of the In LEGO, We Connect exhibition (the very first one) and only now could we take a break, pause the rollercoaster and share some cityscapes for you to enjoy this fine Sunday together with the chocolate*.

Happy Easter !


(*) Easter Egg Chocolate can seriously damage your health. Only use in sufficient qualities and indulge in the cacao.

In LEGO, …

Lego (/ˈlɛɡ/) is a line of plastic construction toys that are manufactured by The Lego Group, a privately held company based in Denmark. LEGO consists of colorful interlocking plastic bricks and an accompanying array of gears, minifigures and various other plastic parts. LEGO bricks can be assembled and connected in many ways, to construct such objects as vehicles, buildings, bridges and wonderlands of imagination and long forgotten childhoods.

The most interesting aspect of LEGO and the long forgotten wonderlands is that it can be captured and explored in what is called Toy Photography.

Toy Photography which will be featuring yours truly in Seattle next month (read March), in the art exhibition “In LEGO, We Connect …” in the Bryan Ohno Gallery next to the fantastic Avanaut and the awesome Lady Corbett.


I am excited !


A selfie (/ˈselfiː/) [1] is a self-portrait photograph, typically taken with a hand-held digital camera or camera phone. Selfies are often shared on social networking services such as Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter. They are usually flattering and made to appear casual. Most selfies are taken with a camera held at arm’s length or pointed at a mirror, rather than by using a self-timer but exceptions do apply.

Today was a selfie day as it was long overdue to get myself a new selfie for work.

Not sure I managed, but the crew had some fun with this shooting experiment.

Here is the one that will not make it to the corporate directory.

Fun it was.

Santa Monica

Santa Monica most iconic landmark is its pier with its own Ferris wheel.

A Ferris wheel that never made it to the world’s tallest ever wheels as published on Wikipedia.

Here is the list of the tallest ever pleasure wheels:

  • 1893: the original Ferris Wheel was 80.4 meters (264 ft) tall. Chicago, US. No longer available and a city I have not visited yet.
  • 1895: the Great Wheel was built for the Empire of India Exhibition at Earls Court, London, UK, and was 94 meters (308 ft) tall. No longer available.
  • 1900: the Grande Roue de Paris was built for the Exposition Universelle, a world’s fair held in Paris, France. I did visit the Eiffel Tower, which counts as another iconic landmark in the city of light.
  • 1997: the Tempozan Ferris Wheel, in Osaka, Japan, opened to the public on July 12, and is 112.5 meters (369 ft) tall. I did visit Osaka, but did not take a ride on the Ferris wheel.
  • 1999: the Daikanransha at Palette Town in Odaiba, Japan, is 115 metres (377 ft) tall. Hmmm. I should visit Japan again.
  • 2000: the London Eye, in London, UK, is 135 meters (443 ft) tall. Check !
  • 2006: the Star of Nanchang, in Nanchang, Jiangxi Province, China, opened for business in May and is 160 metres (525 ft) tall. Added to my Todo list.
  • 2008: the Singapore Flyer, in Singapore, is 165 meters (541 ft) tall. I really need to visit Inna and Harri.
  • 2014: the High Roller, in Las Vegas, Nevada, US, is 167.6 meters (550 ft) tall. It opened to the public on March 31, 2014, and is currently the world’s tallest Ferris wheel and has just been added to my new addiction of shooting Ferries wheels. Probably.


Let me know below in the comments if there is a different “Ferries” city I should add to my To Do list …


A New Hope – Part II

It has been awhile.

Almost 4 years ago a new “little” creative project was born here on this same spot when Me2 was introduced into our family.

While our “little” companion did not yet had its own website(s), he soon started to engage in my own IG account and spam my Facebook timeline with his plastic pictures.

One of the most epic shoots of Me2, never published on IG, is Me2 and the Sfinx shot at location in Malta, still available here on my own “livefeed”.
It was the beginning of a new era in Plastic.

Soon thereafter Me2 got his own IG account, followed by Flickr, WWW, SmugMug, Twitter, … (the whole package) and our little friend got wings of his own. Clearly separated from my own doings.

I have never made a secret here I am part of the Creative Crew behind this little fellow, yet Me2 has been kind of secret about it, putting rightfully the focus on himself.

When we were discussing the year ahead in the latest selfie shoot of Darth, Me2 flagged to me I should get more actively engaged again (he needed some “outing”) as he would have difficulties in getting his own ESTA approved to visit the USA. I must admit I was slightly flabbergasted.

A little plastic man of about 4 cm that has no problem in getting to travel to The Death Star™ and Beyond™, and post pictures on IG needed me for an ESTA.

Why ?

And then he told me.
He got himself not only stuck in plastic, he also got himself exposed in an art exhibition.

In Seattle.

I am soooo very proud to announce that Me2 (and so his  Chief Creative Crew Member, read me) got an exclusive Art Exhibition in Seattle together with Shelly Corbett (aka xxSJC) and Vesa Lehtimäki (aka Avanaut).

Expect some more Plastic in this New Year.


PS. If you are close to Seattle, Planet Earth do reserve the date. March 5th.


Turnarounds are scheduled events wherein an entire process unit of an industrial plant is taken offstream for an extended period for revamp and/or renewal. Turnaround is a blanket term that encompasses more specific terms such as Inspection & Testing, debottlenecking projects, revamps and catalyst regeneration projects.

Turnaround can also be used as a synonym of shutdowns and outages and 2014 has just gone into such a turnaround while 2015 is taken online by Planet Earth.

In Belgium we used to have a tradition of giving the turnaround mission statement in what most people call their New Years Resolution.

I am not going to turn this post into a promise of absolutes, with no more wine, commitments to daily gym sessions and only healthy veggie juices instead of caffeine for breakfast or committing to run half a marathon (these are just the healthy ones).

No such absolutes.
I am not taking myself into a full stop turnaround.

Yet I do want to take a next step in my creative passions in 2015 and take my photography to the next level.

A level I will be sharing here with you.

For now, I wish you a perfect turnaround into 2015.


Sheep (Ovis aries) are quadrupedal, ruminant mammals typically kept as livestock or seen running your local telecom provider here in Sweden. Like all ruminants, sheep are members of the order Artiodactyla, the even-toed ungulates. Although the name “sheep” applies to many species in the genus Ovis, in everyday usage it almost always refers to Ovis aries.

Numbering a little over one billion, domestic sheep are also the most numerous species of sheep. An adult female sheep is referred to as a ewe (/juː/), an intact male as a ram or occasionally a tup, a castrated male as a wether, and a younger sheep as a lamb while the entrepreneurial one goes by the name of Frank.

We bumped into Franks family on the island of Andøya, Norway this summer on our way to Cape North.



In the U.S. and Canada, jelly refers to a clear or translucent fruit spread made from sweetened fruit juice and is set by using its naturally occurring pectin, whereas outside North America (read Europe and the rest of the world) jelly most of the time refers to a gelatin-based dessert. Unless you are talking to a marine biologist specialized in the non-polyp form of individuals of the Phylum Cnidaria.

The difference is subtle, yet important.


Jelly can be made from sweet, savory or hot ingredients. It is made by a process similar to that used for making jam, with the additional step of filtering out the fruit pulp after the initial heating. A stockinette “jelly bag” is traditionally used as a filter, suspended by string over a bowl to allow the straining to occur gently under gravity. It is important not to attempt to force the straining process, for example by squeezing the mass of fruit into the stockings or the clarity of the resulting jelly will be compromised.
Patience is a virtue when talking Jelly.

Jelly can come in a variety of flavors such as grape jelly, strawberry jelly, hot chile pepper and even jellyfish.

It is typically eaten with a variety of foods. This includes jelly with toast, or a peanut butter and jelly sandwich.
The Jellyfish variant is considered a delicacy in Japan and Korea.
Dried that is.

Jelly Too

Pectin (from Ancient Greek: πηκτικός pēktikós, “congealed, curdled”) is a structural heteropolysaccharide contained in the primary cell walls of terrestrial plants and not found in Jellyfish.

It was first isolated and described in 1825 by Henri Braconnot.

It is produced commercially as a white powder, mainly extracted from citrus fruits, and is used in food as a gelling agent, particularly in jams and jellies.

Not to be confused with gels used in photography (that is another post).

“Good jelly is clear and sparkling and has a fresh flavor of the fruit from which it is made. It is tender enough to quiver when moved, but holds angles when cut.”

Now that is a definition I like.



This morning we had our own private photo walk here on the island trying to catch the first light of the day on our digital celluloid.  After agreeing last night over a few glasses of Ardbeg that catching the first rays of sun was a very good idea, we sat out around 7 with some fresh coffee and warm clothes (at least some of us) to the harbor, waiting for the sun to come.

And a wonderful wait it was …