Waiting

This morning we had our own private photo walk here on the island trying to catch the first light of the day on our digital celluloid.  After agreeing last night over a few glasses of Ardbeg that catching the first rays of sun was a very good idea, we sat out around 7 with some fresh coffee and warm clothes (at least some of us) to the harbor, waiting for the sun to come.

And a wonderful wait it was …

Gjesvær

Gjesvær (Northern Sami: Geaissvearra) is an old fishing village in Nordkapp Municipality in Finnmark county, Norway and just a stone cast away from Cape North. It is the only place in Finnmark known from the Viking Age and is mentioned in the Heimskringla saga as Geirsver.

The name comes from the man’s name Geir, which means “spear”.

The location was used by Vikings on the way to Bjarmaland, and probably also for gathering food and selfies on the nearby Gjesværstappan islands which contain one of the largest seabird colonies in Norway.

Gjesvær has a special place in our heart and we will for sure go back to hunt for the Aurora Borealis.

The Lighthouse

A lighthouse is a tower, building, or other type of structure designed to emit light from a system of lamps and lenses and used as a navigational aid for maritime pilots at sea or on inland waterways.

Lighthouses mark dangerous coastlines, hazardous shoals, reefs, safe entries to harbors, and can also assist in aerial navigation.

Lighthouses are beautiful.

Manilla

Manila (Philippine English: /məˈnɪlə/; Tagalog: Maynilà, [majˈnilaʔ]) is the capital of the Philippines. It is one of the sixteen cities which, along with the municipality of Pateros, make up Metro Manila, the National Capital Region, whose overall population is around 12 million.

The populace inhabit an area of only 3,855 hectares makes Manila arguably the most densely populated city in the world.

Honey Inc.

Honey /ˈhʌni/ is a sweet food made by bees using nectar from flowers. The variety produced by honey bees (the genus Apis) is the one most commonly referred to, as it is the type of honey collected by most beekeepers, consumed by people and shot here on location at a local market in Istri.

Saint Vitus Cathedral

The Metropolitan Cathedral of Saints Vitus, Wenceslaus and Adalbert (Czech: metropolitní katedrála svatého Víta, Václava a Vojtěcha) is a Roman Catholic metropolitan cathedral in the city of Prague and the seat of the Archbishop of Prague.

Up to 1997, the cathedral was dedicated only to Saint Vitus, and is still commonly named only as St. Vitus Cathedral and we respect this ancient tradition.

Bosiljak …

Basil, Thai basil, or sweet basil, is a common name for the culinary herb Ocimum basilicum (UK /ˈbæzəl/;[1] US /ˈbeɪzəl/[2]) of the family Lamiaceae (mints), sometimes known as Saint Joseph’s Wort in some English-speaking countries or just simply Bosiljak.

The Ferry ….

A ferry (or ferryboat) is a boat or ship (a merchant vessel) used to carry (or ferry) primarily passengers, and sometimes vehicles and cargo as well, across a body of water. Most ferries operate on regular, frequent, return services. A passenger ferry with many stops, such as in Venice, Italy, is sometimes called a water bus or water taxi but not to be mistaken with the Vaxholm Taxi boats, which are real taxis.

Ferries form a part of the public transport systems of many waterside cities and islands (including mine), allowing direct transit between points at a capital cost much lower than bridges or tunnels.

Fishing Vessel …

A fishing vessel is a boat or ship used to catch fish in the sea, or on a lake or river. Many different kinds of vessels are used in commercial, artisan and recreational fishing.

According to the FAO, there are currently more than four million commercial fishing vessels of which there is one shown in the picture above.

Note to self, 4 million fishing boats is a fraction of the more than one billion cars we have. 

The Crew

A crew is a body or a class of people who work at a common activity, generally in a structured or hierarchical organization. The word has nautical resonances: the tasks involved in operating a ship, particularly a sailing ship, providing numerous specialities within a ship’s crew, often organised with a chain of command (hmm, curious where the boss is hanging out).

Crew is also used colloquially to refer to a small, tight-knit group of friends or associates engaged in criminal activity. Also used in reference to the traditional “unit” of criminals under the supervision of a caporegime in the American Mafia.

Crew can also refer simply to a group of friends, unrelated to crime or violence.

Guess which category our crew falls into ?