Sheep (Ovis aries) are quadrupedal, ruminant mammals typically kept as livestock or seen running your local telecom provider here in Sweden. Like all ruminants, sheep are members of the order Artiodactyla, the even-toed ungulates. Although the name “sheep” applies to many species in the genus Ovis, in everyday usage it almost always refers to Ovis aries.

Numbering a little over one billion, domestic sheep are also the most numerous species of sheep. An adult female sheep is referred to as a ewe (/juː/), an intact male as a ram or occasionally a tup, a castrated male as a wether, and a younger sheep as a lamb while the entrepreneurial one goes by the name of Frank.

We bumped into Franks family on the island of Andøya, Norway this summer on our way to Cape North.



In the U.S. and Canada, jelly refers to a clear or translucent fruit spread made from sweetened fruit juice and is set by using its naturally occurring pectin, whereas outside North America (read Europe and the rest of the world) jelly most of the time refers to a gelatin-based dessert. Unless you are talking to a marine biologist specialized in the non-polyp form of individuals of the Phylum Cnidaria.

The difference is subtle, yet important.


Jelly can be made from sweet, savory or hot ingredients. It is made by a process similar to that used for making jam, with the additional step of filtering out the fruit pulp after the initial heating. A stockinette “jelly bag” is traditionally used as a filter, suspended by string over a bowl to allow the straining to occur gently under gravity. It is important not to attempt to force the straining process, for example by squeezing the mass of fruit into the stockings or the clarity of the resulting jelly will be compromised.
Patience is a virtue when talking Jelly.

Jelly can come in a variety of flavors such as grape jelly, strawberry jelly, hot chile pepper and even jellyfish.

It is typically eaten with a variety of foods. This includes jelly with toast, or a peanut butter and jelly sandwich.
The Jellyfish variant is considered a delicacy in Japan and Korea.
Dried that is.

Jelly Too

Pectin (from Ancient Greek: πηκτικός pēktikós, “congealed, curdled”) is a structural heteropolysaccharide contained in the primary cell walls of terrestrial plants and not found in Jellyfish.

It was first isolated and described in 1825 by Henri Braconnot.

It is produced commercially as a white powder, mainly extracted from citrus fruits, and is used in food as a gelling agent, particularly in jams and jellies.

Not to be confused with gels used in photography (that is another post).

“Good jelly is clear and sparkling and has a fresh flavor of the fruit from which it is made. It is tender enough to quiver when moved, but holds angles when cut.”

Now that is a definition I like.



This morning we had our own private photo walk here on the island trying to catch the first light of the day on our digital celluloid.  After agreeing last night over a few glasses of Ardbeg that catching the first rays of sun was a very good idea, we sat out around 7 with some fresh coffee and warm clothes (at least some of us) to the harbor, waiting for the sun to come.

And a wonderful wait it was …