Turnaround

Turnarounds are scheduled events wherein an entire process unit of an industrial plant is taken offstream for an extended period for revamp and/or renewal. Turnaround is a blanket term that encompasses more specific terms such as Inspection & Testing, debottlenecking projects, revamps and catalyst regeneration projects.

Turnaround can also be used as a synonym of shutdowns and outages and 2014 has just gone into such a turnaround while 2015 is taken online by Planet Earth.

In Belgium we used to have a tradition of giving the turnaround mission statement in what most people call their New Years Resolution.

I am not going to turn this post into a promise of absolutes, with no more wine, commitments to daily gym sessions and only healthy veggie juices instead of caffeine for breakfast or committing to run half a marathon (these are just the healthy ones).

No such absolutes.
I am not taking myself into a full stop turnaround.

Yet I do want to take a next step in my creative passions in 2015 and take my photography to the next level.

A level I will be sharing here with you.

For now, I wish you a perfect turnaround into 2015.

Cheap

Sheep (Ovis aries) are quadrupedal, ruminant mammals typically kept as livestock or seen running your local telecom provider here in Sweden. Like all ruminants, sheep are members of the order Artiodactyla, the even-toed ungulates. Although the name “sheep” applies to many species in the genus Ovis, in everyday usage it almost always refers to Ovis aries.

Numbering a little over one billion, domestic sheep are also the most numerous species of sheep. An adult female sheep is referred to as a ewe (/juː/), an intact male as a ram or occasionally a tup, a castrated male as a wether, and a younger sheep as a lamb while the entrepreneurial one goes by the name of Frank.

We bumped into Franks family on the island of Andøya, Norway this summer on our way to Cape North.

 

Jelly

In the U.S. and Canada, jelly refers to a clear or translucent fruit spread made from sweetened fruit juice and is set by using its naturally occurring pectin, whereas outside North America (read Europe and the rest of the world) jelly most of the time refers to a gelatin-based dessert. Unless you are talking to a marine biologist specialized in the non-polyp form of individuals of the Phylum Cnidaria.

The difference is subtle, yet important.

Jelly

Jelly can be made from sweet, savory or hot ingredients. It is made by a process similar to that used for making jam, with the additional step of filtering out the fruit pulp after the initial heating. A stockinette “jelly bag” is traditionally used as a filter, suspended by string over a bowl to allow the straining to occur gently under gravity. It is important not to attempt to force the straining process, for example by squeezing the mass of fruit into the stockings or the clarity of the resulting jelly will be compromised.
Patience is a virtue when talking Jelly.

Jelly can come in a variety of flavors such as grape jelly, strawberry jelly, hot chile pepper and even jellyfish.

It is typically eaten with a variety of foods. This includes jelly with toast, or a peanut butter and jelly sandwich.
The Jellyfish variant is considered a delicacy in Japan and Korea.
Dried that is.

Jelly Too

Pectin (from Ancient Greek: πηκτικός pēktikós, “congealed, curdled”) is a structural heteropolysaccharide contained in the primary cell walls of terrestrial plants and not found in Jellyfish.

It was first isolated and described in 1825 by Henri Braconnot.

It is produced commercially as a white powder, mainly extracted from citrus fruits, and is used in food as a gelling agent, particularly in jams and jellies.

Not to be confused with gels used in photography (that is another post).

“Good jelly is clear and sparkling and has a fresh flavor of the fruit from which it is made. It is tender enough to quiver when moved, but holds angles when cut.”

Now that is a definition I like.

Jelly.

Waiting

This morning we had our own private photo walk here on the island trying to catch the first light of the day on our digital celluloid.  After agreeing last night over a few glasses of Ardbeg that catching the first rays of sun was a very good idea, we sat out around 7 with some fresh coffee and warm clothes (at least some of us) to the harbor, waiting for the sun to come.

And a wonderful wait it was …

Gjesvær

Gjesvær (Northern Sami: Geaissvearra) is an old fishing village in Nordkapp Municipality in Finnmark county, Norway and just a stone cast away from Cape North. It is the only place in Finnmark known from the Viking Age and is mentioned in the Heimskringla saga as Geirsver.

The name comes from the man’s name Geir, which means “spear”.

The location was used by Vikings on the way to Bjarmaland, and probably also for gathering food and selfies on the nearby Gjesværstappan islands which contain one of the largest seabird colonies in Norway.

Gjesvær has a special place in our heart and we will for sure go back to hunt for the Aurora Borealis.

The Whale

Shot at location in Norway.

Did you know the original title of Moby Dick was The Whale ?

Coffee

Walpurgis

Walpurgis Night is the eve of the feast day of Saint Walpurga, an 8th-century abbess in Germany. In German folklore Walpurgisnacht is believed to be the night of a witches’ meeting on the Brocken, the highest peak in the Harz Mountains, a range of wooded hills in central Germany between the rivers Weser and Elbe.

The first known written occurrence of the English translation ‘Walpurgis Night‘ is from the 19th century. Local variants of Walpurgis Night are observed across Europe in the Netherlands, Germany, the Czech Republic, Sweden, Lithuania, Latvia, Finland and Estonia.

In the United States, Walpurgisnacht is one of the major holidays celebrated within LaVeyan Satanism and is the anniversary of the founding of the Church of Satan.

Not sure everyone in Sweden is aware of this little fact when we take friends, family and kids out for the traditional Walpurgis Night.

The Lighthouse

A lighthouse is a tower, building, or other type of structure designed to emit light from a system of lamps and lenses and used as a navigational aid for maritime pilots at sea or on inland waterways.

Lighthouses mark dangerous coastlines, hazardous shoals, reefs, safe entries to harbors, and can also assist in aerial navigation.

Lighthouses are beautiful.

Manilla

Manila (Philippine English: /məˈnɪlə/; Tagalog: Maynilà, [majˈnilaʔ]) is the capital of the Philippines. It is one of the sixteen cities which, along with the municipality of Pateros, make up Metro Manila, the National Capital Region, whose overall population is around 12 million.

The populace inhabit an area of only 3,855 hectares makes Manila arguably the most densely populated city in the world.